State of Things – JZH Gaming (4/25/17)

Hello all!

Another week of gaming is under our belt since last weeks “State of Things” post, and I’d like to share where everything is at with the website here as well as the YouTube channel.

Altlesjo and I are both playing Final Fantasy XIV  – currently in it’s Heavenward expansion with the Stormblood expansion coming in the 3rd week of June. Altlesjo has just started and I have finally reached level 60 and currently working on raising my ilvl and finishing up the main story quests involved with Heavensward so I can be ready for Stormblood at launch (hopefully pre-launch with the pre-order). I have shared some content already, and I will continue to have random streams and video uploads of FFXIV game play, but nothing set in stone at the moment. My plan moving forward is to stick with FFXIV, and offset down time with that with other games, such as Star Trek Online and eventually Elite Dangerous. I cannot speak too much towards altlesjo’s intentions, except I can say with confidence that neither one of us will play a F2P MMO ever again.

If you are interested in FFXIV and would like to be able to play with either one of us – doesn’t matter if you are new or not, we play in the North American (Primal) Data Center on the Brynhildr Server. The great thing about this game is that no matter if you are on PC or PS4, as long as we are on the same server, we can all play together. On top of that, for raids there is cross-server capability.

Streaming Schedule (Current Plan)

  • Mondays – 10pm Eastern – The J&J Show (note: we will be starting it up again soon, we let everyone know when.
  • Tuesday – Thursday – 8pm Eastern – FFXIV – Random streams, will not happen every night most likely
  • Friday – 7pm Eastern – Star Trek Online – Elite Queue runs, Battlezones, etc
  • Friday – 8:30/9pm Eastern – FFXIV
  • Saturday – 7pm Eastern – Mass Effect: Andromeda Multiplayer – Dependent on participation, if no one available, I will stream FFXIV
  • Saturday – 8:30/9pm Eastern – Final Fantasy XIV Game Play
  • Sunday – No Streams Planned

So, main nights for streaming will be Friday and Saturday – beginning with STO and ME:A respectively, then switching gears to FFXIV. The main drive, currently, for making videos other then streams will be FFXIV, followed by builds, etc for STO.

This week, I plan on making a page of links for FFXIV. This will contain YouTube channels I have been following as well as links to guides and discussions that I have found helpful – for all classes and jobs. The Star Trek Online page will also have some updates with YouTube channels and specifically important videos moving forward.

Lastly, thanks to all! If there is anything you would like to see in the games/streams listed above, let me know and I will see if I can make it happen.

LLAP,
jzhnutz

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Horizon Zero Dawn – Launch Day Stream – J&J Show Special

Well, it begins! Horizon Zero Dawn released yesterday, and altlesjo and I joined up and had a steaming event. Meaning I streamed… he yelled… I silently hoped he would finally die… and we had a blast playing and talking about the newest action/adventure/rpg to hit PS4.

On a show note – we finally ran a full stream through the capture device and used discord for our chat audio… so, we finally believe we have that fixed.

On a YouTube note, we will have more videos of HZD to share over the next couple of weeks.

Note: The stream ended abruptly roughly an hour and a half in, to see the rest click here.

JZH Gaming – State of Nutz

Good day to everyone!

I wanted to run down what JZH Gaming has been up to and where everything is headed so far. If you follow me on YouTube, you will know that I and those who I play with have been heavily focused on Star Trek Online for PS4. This will still be the case moving forward, but with a few caveats.

First – STO is the “primary” focus, however, I will not be putting in the grind like I have been over the past 5-6 months. I will still be posting builds, still be running Hive Onslaught on Elite, and others as well, but I, and others like me, have gotten to the point where we essentially have everything we need and can get to compete at the highest levels in STO on PS4. our 6 minute Hive Space Elite run is proof of that, as well as subsequent runs of 7 minutes and 6 1/2 minutes respectively with different groups of people. I have been honored to be apart of a great group of people both on PS4 with our fleets – Stargaryen Federation (Fed Fleet) and the Stargaryen Empire (KDF fleet), as well as people on the PC side of things – and those people are linked on my YouTube channel. I look forward to continued interactions with these people moving forward. However, like most people, I am not a one game type of person – I love role-playing games, and have been slowly going through Final Fantasy 15 with my children. I am also looking forward to some games coming out, but more on that in a minute.

The main reason for slowing down on STO – beyond the obvious plateau in ways – is that Cryptic has yet to fix some of the fundamental issues plaguing the game – some – like the tailor and getting stuck while cloaked bugs have been there since the beginning. Others, like the turn rate bug, have been off again-on again issues that for whatever reason, Cryptic cannot seem to get a grip on. I understand the game is F2P, at the same time, myself, and a lot of other people, have sunk a lot of time, money and effort into this game – and lets face it, even if the Temporal Transponder was working, Agents of Yesterday, from a content perspective, was a severe joke – almost as if it was April 1st already. I get it, it’s what PC got, and yes, the new content is great, but it feels lacking. On top of that, the other content that we are all looking forward to – ships – has seemingly been designed to have the “must haves” released in such a way where it feels like every week we are having to buy a new ship to a) master for a trait and b) change our build up once again. One reason I have stuck with the Kelvin Intel Dreadnought for so long is because it works, and it works well – but to answer the question, yes, I have bought the other ship packs across the board except maybe a couple. I get it – Cryptic needs to make money to justify putting resources on the table when it comes to STO, problem is, this problem is not just on PS4 – but goes across the board on all platforms. I will say that with the Badlands introduced with AoY, the grind for marks will not be as bad as it was for Iconian, but that is really the only bright spot besides Temporal Spec coming in – because besides Crystalline Catastrophe, the PvE additions are all a joke, or worse, not worth the time and effort in running them.

I don’t see Cryptic fixing their shit any time soon – and that’s fine – I don’t see myself spending any more money any time soon either. To update – I have all of the ships I have wanted since before STO came out except two lobi ships which are not available yet. I have enough lobi to cover those and also tachyokinetic convertors once those are released. So, from that perspective, I am good.

Now that the bad is out of the way – I am still working on builds, working on the new reputations, working on getting our Hive Space Elite down even quicker – STO just does not have my undivided gaming attention anymore. For what will be sharing my attention, here we go…

Final Fantasy 15 – still taking it slow, partly because I try to play it with my kids around because the like it, AND it is how my dad played Final Fantasy games. I don’t see myself beating it anytime soon, and I probably will not post any videos or have any streams of FF15, but I will be on it from time to time. Still one of the best RPGs I have played since the Witcher 3.

Horizon Zero Dawn – Both I, and altlesjo (my YouTube partner) will be playing this. THIS game I will be streaming and uploading videos – so everyone will have an opportunity to see what some people have called the best looking game on PS4 along with me. I have been looking forward to this for a long time, and I am excited to pop it in tomorrow.

Mass Effect: Andromeda – Comes out in the middle of March – same goes for this game, will be streaming, etc.

Elite: Dangerous – Will release on PS4 in Q2 – no exact date yet, but I have played a trial on PC and watched a lot of material on this game. This looks to be my “other” MMO aside from STO, and i am looking forward to this game a lot as well.

Minecraft – Another game I have always loved – will play mostly on PS4 with a little bit on PC. Cooking up a Star Trek themed escape on Ps4 right now, and some PC friends already have some stuff that looks amazing – one of them is Darth Protius. A STO science guru in his own right, he has put a lot of effort into his Minecraft endeavors. Worth a look.

On a streaming note – I now have the capability to stream through my PC using an Elgato HD60s – so, streams and our J&J Show should be getting a lot better – and a little more complicated.

So – to some it all up – still going to be doing STO, just not as heavy. Look for more variety in content, and as always, keep sending me questions, comments and ideas.

LLAP,
jzhnutz

Final Fantasy XV – The Journey So Far

ff15I’m 12 hours in – of those 12 hours my oldest son has shared the experience with me for around 6 of those hours. We are both enjoying the whimsical moments brought on by the “bros,” as well as the graphics, fight sequences and story so far.

The experience, at least for me, goes far beyond the quests and side missions, goes past the new fighting, even goes beyond the graphics, story and the incredible homage the game does to it’s past. For me, it is the wonderful experience of having a Final Fantasy game to share with my children, much like my own father did with me and my siblings. Like my son in the picture above, I would sit and follow along in the strategy guide. Much like me, my son asks me questions that seem totally out of the blue – seemingly having nothing to do what is going on with the game at the moment, then suddenly making sense as I move along a little more. I wrote a post about how the experience of Final Fantasy with my own father was to me, and I hope that one day my sons will do the same.

So, 12 hours in, and so far the experience with my son wins the top prize. However, not everyone will be playing the game the same way as me, or have the cheerleaders that I have. There have been a ton of reviews so far, and they all pretty much say the same thing – don’t need to watch Kingsglaive, but if you do, the game makes more sense. The story is typical Final Fantasy, in that, it doesn’t make sense (even with the movie?). Graphically amazing for its time (again, typical of Final Fantasy). Game play, fighting, etc is amazing (typical). In other words, everything we truly expect a Final Fantasy game to be, this on embodies in some sense, yet because it is on the “next-gen,” soon to be the “old-gen” systems, the game is leaps and bounds beyond anything we have seen before.

I just got into chapter 3 – yep, taking my (our) time, setting a turtles pace to play the game. This is in part because my son likes to see what is “over there,” and also in part because I am a completionist. I’m only 12 hours in because my son commands me “not to get to far ahead” when he has to go to bed or take a nap, and as hard as it is to listen to him, I am trying to. For review purposes, I find that I have in reality finished the prologue to the game – which at 12 hours is a very nice prologue indeed for a Square Enix RPG, and very fitting to the Final Fantasy universe. I am not in “phase 2” of the game, where it truly becomes open world. Saying that, If there was some sort of ending in “phase 1” of the game – with around 11 hours in that phase, I would not have been disappointment. What I mean is – add several more main quests and double the side quests – make “phase 1” another 5-10 hours longer, and compared to a lot of games over the past couple of years, you would feel like you got your monies worth. There is enough to do in “phase 1” to keep you occupied – probably more then 12 hours if you are so inclined to grind level and what not. I also know there are places I have not seen in the area, as well as quests that are not completed yet – hunts, mystery maps, dungeons, etc.

Maybe it is because I have taken my time I feel a completeness in this part of the game, but I do feel that as a prologue type area, it goes above and beyond what is necessary… and I love this game for it. I spent another hour in Duscae just doing hunts, and everywhere I turn a new question mark pops up on my map – and the map itself stretches far and wide. Knowing how long it took me to get through the first phase, I can only imagine how long it will take me to get to “phase 3” – which is the more linear portion of the game.

I can’t say enough about the visuals of the game – they are simply amazing. How the world itself interacts, and of course your companions, is phenomenal. The only game I have played that reaches this type of greatness is The Witcher 3 – and that game had a lot of visual flaws and glitches. So far, for me, this game has been pretty seamless. Granted, I’m not a graphics expert – don’t expect me to tel lyou that it is 30 fps until point A then goes to 15, etc – I don’t care as long as it looks amazing to me, and it does.

Questing so far hasn’t been dull – though I get a sense of the fetch quests becoming so, it hasn’t happened yet. Maybe it is my own play style – switching it up with a hunt, then fetch quest, another hunt and so on. Maybe its because my son never seems to get bored and his amazement is contagious. I don’t know, but so far nothing has felt bland or blah. Again, for me, that’s an amazing thing to say for an RPG – again, comparing to The Witcher 3, though I wanted to do those quests, they eventually grew dry and dull. These so far have not (maybe its because I fill most of my time playing MMO games too).

Music – I can ride in a car and listen to the Final Fantasy VII soundtrack… enough said (or any other sound track from a Final Fantasy game). World music is amazing too, my kids get a kick out of the “country” music in the games early rest areas.

Combat – the big one!! I was unsure how I would like the new fighting mechanics – I’m old school. I put up with FFXIII because i thought the game was decent – but beyond that, I like the iterations before that. I like turn based in my Final Fantasy. It’s what I grew up on. Yet, from the very beginning, I find that I really like how combat flows in this game – I also think my dad, if he was still around, would have liked it as well – and from the look on my son’s face, I know he likes how it looks (if he could ever figure out how to use two joysticks at the same time, he’d be playing it). It flows very well – and it isn’t as complicated as I thought it would be. It can be simple, yet explosive, and so far, even with easy enemies, hasn’t gotten mundane. Also, the fact that you can use the Wait system (I haven’t yet), and put the game into Easy mode (I have for a night time hunt to get past the Daemons) on the fly, is a really good system for this game.

Overall, so far, I still would rate this game below The Witcher 3 – it’s hard to beat that game, especially with it’s two amazing DLC packs. However, it’s not far behind it at all, and if the DLC packs over the next, who knows, are really good, it can become it’s equal in my mind. However, unlike TW3, I can play this game with my son (as well as the rest of my children), and that, in itself, is awesome.

I’m pretty sure my oldest son would give this game a 10, and so far being able to share this game with him like my own dad did so many times with me is an A+.

Photo Credit – My Beautiful Wife

Final Fantasy – A Family Tradition

First off, this post is not as much about the game as it is my own personal experience with the franchise. It’s not even just about Final Fantasy, but about a deep and meaningful sense of purpose that was given to me at a young age.

Twenty-six years ago my dad brought home Final Fantasy for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). I was ten years old, and had already watched my dad play through the Legend of Zelda, Dragon Warrior and the like. I had joined him on the journey in those games, as well as others, and I remember well joining him on what would become a life long affair with a game series that the producers of the game saw as their last gasp. Final Fantasy, the original, was everything a lover of role playing games could ask for at the time on a home console, and eventually would become one of the largest names in the genre.

My dad loved it – and subsequently, loved every Final Fantasy, or Final Fantasyesqe game that came out – think Chrono Trigger, etc. Dutifully,  would watch my dad play for hours and hours, into the wee hours of the morning, especially on the weekends. When we moved and my brother and I had our own floor (a former attic), the gaming TV and the game systems followed with us, and so did my dad – at least on Friday nights. We would sit there on the floor, as he sat on a dusty and lumpy old love seat, mesmerized as he defeated enemies and leveled up. We followed along in the strategy guide, telling him where treasure was. He patiently would move back and forth, in what we now call grinding, in the same spot for hours, leveling up.

It’s one of the most pleasant memories of my childhood, and even into my adulthood, I would follow him along as he journeyed in the lands created by Square Soft, and later, Square Enix. My dad wasn’t the greatest JRPG (Japanese Role Playing Game) player, but his attention to detail insured he left no stone unturned. His desire for perfection is what ultimately led to him never completing Final Fantasy XII – he missed the Zephyr Spear because he unfortunately opened a chest in the beginning hours of the game. He, of course, as a “completionist”, restarted. I don’t remember how far he got in his second play through before he had his stroke that left him physically incapable of playing, but I know he was probably close to the end again. I also don’t remember if he actually got the spear – I would like to think he did, but again, that was nine years ago, and unfortunately we had more important things on our minds. I, of course, was playing as well – but likewise, I never finished the game due to the upheaval. This led to one of my biggest regrets – we, as a family, left a Final Fantasy game unfinished – a first.

Eventually over the next couple of years, I became a family man myself. Marrying my beautiful wife, and at the time of this writing, having five beautiful and wondrous children to call my own. I played Final Fantasy XIII and XIII-2 – not enjoying them as much as previous titles, but playing and beating them nonetheless. Lightning Returns, not so much. I begane playing Final Fantasy XIV and my three oldest children loved it. With exclamations like, “its a chocobo!” the would sit and watch me play for hours – like a lot of games. However, beyond their random comments, the interaction was minimal.

With Final Fantasy XV, this has begun to change. My oldest son, who is six years old, has dutifully watched me play a couple of hours over the past couple of nights.  He has anxiously waited on me to complete my other “gaming duties” – I run a successful Star Trek Online fleet (think guild) on Playstation 4, and the moment I click on the FF15 icon, he grabs his blanket, runs to the couch, sits down and smiles. The interactions are priceless – “daddy, those guys look like robots,” (Imperial magitek soldiers), “Daddy, your car is awesome and gold,” (it has the chocobo skin from the pre-order), to, “daddy, its getting dark, you don’t want the real bad guys to get you.” I have been trying to connect with video games with my children – at least one of them – like my dad did with me, and it seems, just like it did with me, Final Fantasy has brought that to pass. Last night he asked me if he could stay up and watch me play tonight, I told him I didn’t know if I would be able to – again, gaming obligations with Star Trek Online, but since it is Friday (I get off early), we can play tomorrow afternoon. There, I said it, “we.”

Final Fantasy XV is a single player game – but for my family, Final Fantasy has always been more then that. An experience shared between father and son, and now that tradition, it seems, is going to continue. Part of me thinks it was a way for my dad to get us to calm down and sit in one place, yet I also understand that my dad felt joy when we did sit next to him, reading him the maps and telling him where to go. I can remember him explaining what he was doing and why he was doing it the way he was – sharing his strategy, sharing his wisdom of trial and error. Much like the way he did with everything in his life – as a clergyman, as a father, as a husband – he learned from his mistakes and triumphs, and passed that knowledge on to his sons and daughter. I’m not banking on my oldest son, or any of my sons and my daughter in fully appreciating Final Fantasy – and in this case, Final Fantasy 15, as much as I ultimately did right away. For one, they are still a lot younger then I was when I began the journey twenty-six years ago. I am, however, thrilled at the prospect of at least one of my children wantonly desiring to share in this game’s journey.

As I was going to bed last night, my wife rolled over and told me that as she was putting my oldest son to bed, he could barely contain his excitement. “Daddy said we are going to play Final Fantasy all afternoon, and he is going to teach me how to use the strategy guide (or something to that effect)!” It hit me, my son is excited – not just for a video game, but because it is something that we have been doing together. I rolled over in bed and realized that so was I.

I still have my dad’s copy of Final Fantasy XII, he, of course, got the collectors edition. I still have his strategy guide, again, the collectors edition. I still have all of his notes, and his marks and checks are still visible in the guide. I don’t have a Playstation 2 – otherwise I would have completed it. I do hold out hope that one day they will “remaster” it for PS4, if only so I can lay that one beast to rest, for both myself and my dad. If that day comes, I know I will have at least one son of my on by my side, and I have a feeling I will have at least four others being just as dutiful to me as I was with my dad.

*Note: My dad passed away in 2014 – I know a lot of people wont get it, my wife sometimes included, but Final Fantasy, at least to me, was and is a very important part of my life and time with him. There are obviously a myriad of other things, many things far more important, but FF has always been the one thing that has stuck out in my mind. I am honored that I have the chance to share that same type of experience with my children that he did with his. I am sure he would have loved this game as well.

Guilds and Gaming

I’m a gamer – meaning I play video games. Much to the chagrin of my wife and to the delight of my children, I love sitting in front of a computer screen and allowing an alternate reality to consume my time. I have been playing video games since I was about five years old – from Super Mario Bros., Dragon Warrior and Final Fantasy (the original) to Skyrim, the Witcher 3 and Star Trek Online. My gaming “career” has spanned for 20+ years, and I have enjoyed every minute of it.

During the span of my gaming lifetime, I began to play video games online – both games that allowed for simple co-op with friends to massive multiplayer online games (MMO’s), and this expanded my horizon when it came to the games I came to love. I’m a role play gamer by heart – meaning I love creating a character and making him or her my own. This began with a free copy of Dragon Warrior from Nintendo Power magazine to anticipating the release of Final Fantasy 15 next month. With my love for RPG’s I began to dabble in a lot of MMO games, and to date have played a lot of them. In that span I have been a part of corporations (EvE Online), guilds, fleets, etc, and have even chose to start and lead my own. My experience is less then some, but it is still vast, and my take on in game organization of players is not unique.

For the sake of wording, let’s just call them guilds. My first experience with this was in EvE Online, and my current experience is being a guild master in both Neverwinter and Star Trek Online, both on Playstation 4. It isn’t easy being in a guild – there are rules, regulations, and requirements. There is typically, if the game is good and thought out, some sort of guild objective to complete. However, without these guilds the game and experience itself would be incomplete. In some games I like to sit back and just be a part of the crowd, yet in others I like to lead from the front. I have ran successful guilds in some games and had disastrous results in others. My guild in Neverwinter, for example, which I have passed off the day to day duties to a good friend of mine, on PS4 is a leading guild, especially around the guilds that don’t charge for admittance. We do have requirements for membership, but they are not strict – the purpose is to both have fun and better the guild at the same time, and in truth, they go hand in hand. My other guild is a Star Trek Online fleet, which, even though only being out for only about 2 months, has grown and carries a good reputation in the community – in fact, both of these guilds carry weight and a good reputation in the community. We are not perfect, far from it, but we are good. I appreciate the fact that people want to join us and be a part of our group, not because we are elite, but because we are not.

Elitism in gaming is a given. There is always going to be those people who are willing to do anything at all to be the best – from paying a ton of money to cheating. We have guilds in game that ensure they are the “best” by forcing people to pay money or in game materials to enter their guilds so they can boost their guild status – though holdings, guild buildings and guild projects. I understand, everyone wants to be in the best position as possible, yet to me, this takes the fun out of the game. Once you have reached the top, there is only one way to go, and that’s down, and it seems to me to be inevitable.  But I digress from my main point. The way I see it there are four types of guilds:

1 – The Elite

These are the guilds that make you purchase your way in. They are typically honest – they take the money or materials and boost the guild to heights that no other guild can reach otherwise. You instantly have access to the best gear, benefits and the like, and you really don’t have to work hard for it, just open your wallet (or in some games, farm the materials / in game currency). These guilds are great – in their own mind, because they are the world’s first in clears, their guild holdings are maxed or way beyond any other guild. They have the right to look down on the little people because they are nowhere near the pinnacle that these guilds have reached. These guild rise fast, but in the end, simply plateau to quickly – and ultimately get caught up to by one of the next types of guilds.

2 – The Militant

These guild usually start out as type 3 – simple groups started by groups of friends that eventually grow because of relationship and overall appreciation for the games. However, due to wanting to be the best – but not wanting to spend money, they fall into the trap that the elite guilds simply by pass through entry requirements. Members are required to donate large amounts of materials – meaning the grind is real in two ways – the personal grind and the guild grind, and what happens is that people will eventually lose interest in the game all together. Grinding is fun, but when it is all you do, it gets old quick. Yes, grinding is a major part of MMO gaming, but when it becomes just that, the fun is gone, and the stress sets in. (My opinion is that gaming should relieve stress, not cause it, at least not on a continual basis). It usually starts out small, but in the end, because the demand to be the best is so high, the need for grinding increases, and eventually will swallow the guild whole. Unfortunately, in the end the guilds like this never actually plateau, they end up getting half way there and they stop. Guild participation is a must at some level for all members, but these guilds end up taking it too far. People get for the slightest reason – it can be as simple as an officer is frustrated because certain donations aren’t coming in, or because someone is asking a stupid question or whining over something. The thought that we have no idea of what is going on in that person’s real life never crosses our mind, only that we are tired of people’s bullshit.

3 – The Ugly

These are the ultimate failures. Again, typically started by a group of friends. Has typical growth but has no real vision. Unfortunately for the guild leadership, is is just as much the fault of the members they bring in as it is their own. They grow in size only to have a roster full of dead weight. No one wants to kick anyone because they do not want to hurt anyone’s feelings, yet there is no active participation, except maybe from a few select people who just want to play the game and could care less about the guild or its functions. These guilds ultimately just fill useless stats by developers – “In 6 months we have 1.2 million players with 1325 guilds!” blah, blah. So, I suppose they are at least good for the bottom line, but not for much else.

4- The Good

The last category of gaming guilds – at least in my mind. To be honest, the have attributes of the elite and the militant – They want to be the best, they want people to participate, they want guild donations, they want active and good members. At the same time, they take the time to cultivate even the most idiotic members – as a friend of mine calls them, “The Potatoes.” They mentor these members as long as they allow it and help them grow into something else. If they don’t grow, they get let go for more viable players. These guilds call for donations and put incentives in place beyond the obvious ones – the growth of the guild. They recognize that people need something for themselves, not just the group as a whole. The guild itself is important, but it always comes down to the individuals that make up the guild. In other words, the guild members don’t get lost in a roster, they are the roster. Growth in these guilds is not as quick as the militant, but it certainly isn’t as slow as the bad. The guild members are happy and they are willing to help the guild grow any way they can. Some help more than others, and these people are recognized. Some only help a little, and appreciation is shown and at the same time they are helped to get to a place where they feel they are free to donate more. There are requirements, rules, etc, yet when these are not met there is an attempt to figure out why and there is an attempt to rectify the problem. These guilds ultimately get to the top, and they get there through hard work and effort. They don’t pay their way to the top and they don’t crack the whip to get there either. These are the guilds that last, these are the guilds that have happy and successful players.

I admit, these descriptions are over generalizations. There are thousands of gaming communities and guilds out there, and to lump them into one category or another is simply too difficult to nail down. I also left off the list my least favorite type of guild or community, and that is the one where the leadership doesn’t even play the game, but rules at the top for no other reason than because they can – not caring for anything or anyone except the number of members on a spreadsheet. This is more of a plantation then a community – and I despise them – but it is what it is. For those in these type of groups, I encourage you to leave and find a home that actually cares. The choice is yours in that matter.

Again, no guild is perfect, and most guilds typically, and fluidly move from one type or another. House Stargaryen, the community I run, as an example has had its militant times – thankfully to our benefit, but sits pretty comfortably in the good zone. In the end, a guild or community should enhance YOUR gaming experience and in turn you should enhance the GUILDs gaming experience – a mutual beneficial relationship. To me, a guild or gaming community should be a place for people who love a particular game or games to come together and participate in that game together. Simple as that. The guild should enhance the gaming experience and not be a detriment to it. Obviously politics and goals will enter the picture, but they should never detract from the game or the gaming experience. They should make it more fun, and not the other way around.